When our magic students have difficulty writing verses for litanies, chants, or spells, we often tell them to read through children’s nursery rhymes. For one thing, nursery rhymes have good meter and rhythm. They also rhyme, which can be important for giving spell verses the proper force.

Another reason we have students refer to nursery rhymes is that many of these rhymes were actually the verses for spells, way back when. No kidding. For instance, nursery rhymes, such as “Jack and Jill” or “London Bridge,” were actually spell verses designed for very specific purposes.

Goosey, Goosey, Gander
Here’s one that always amazes me. Did you know that the “Goosey, Goosey, Gander” rhyme was originally written to program an energy matrix that looked like a goose to follow certain people around the castle? In other words, the spell created an apparition that looked like a goose that would follow people around. In magical terminology, the goose was a “watcher.”

It takes a lot of energy to program a watcher as large and complex as goose, but it can be done. Most of the time, magical practitioners program much smaller versions, such as flies or bugs. Flies are small and unobtrusive, which makes them the perfect watchers. Most people don’t pay much attention to them.

What To Do With Watchers
How do you know if you have a spell matrix watcher following you around your house? If the watcher takes the form of a fly, it may look like a fly but it won’t act like one. Flies buzz around randomly, with unpredictable flight paths. A watcher fly, in contrast, will fly in straight lines, and will “follow” you in a way that a fly won’t. A real fly will buzz around and bother you, but it won’t track you in a directed way. A watcher will.

What do you do if you find a watcher? Smack it, just like you would a regular fly. No worries!