For those of us who have had a lot of practice making resolutions or goals, the “manana plan” is quite familiar. How many times have we said to ourselves, “Oh, I won’t make the goal I set for myself today because I want to do [fill in the blank] instead, but I’ll make up for it tomorrow by doing twice as much”?

If you’ve tried making up for yesterday’s sins, which means “missing the mark,” by working doubly hard today, you know that it doesn’t work for very long. Inevitably, we get caught up in juggling the debts of many yesterdays past and get lost in the mix. Or sometimes we accumulate so many debts from yesterday that it will take all of today plus a million tomorrows to make up the difference. At that point, most of us give up on our aims and goals. Ultimately, we are faced with such an impossible load of “makeup” work that we lack the will power to get it done.

Many religious and metaphysical practices talk about this phenomenon. For example, the Bible talks about “our daily bread.” What does our daily bread mean? It means that we must take each day as its own day, with its own realizations, achievements and inspirations. We can’t live on yesterday’s bread, but must create today’s bread afresh each day. It is said that every single day is a microcosm of our lives. In each day, we can choose to move toward our aim or to be distracted by outside influences and people. When we are busy, it seems like all the days flow together and a single day doesn’t seem all that important. But when we consider that each day is a miniature model of our entire lives, we can begin to see the importance of each day. The decisions we make today can drastically shape the direction and force of our lives.

There’s another factor that is important to consider here. If we agree that the each day must be lived as an independent unit, then we realize that guilt, revenge, regret and like feelings have no place in our lives. Sure, someone may have wronged us yesterday, but will we use that as an excuse to distract us from our aim today? Or perhaps we didn’t achieve all we set out to do today — will we allow ourselves to lose force over that tomorrow and further deter us from our aims?

When we think about the progression of days in this way, we begin to see that nothing that happened yesterday is reason enough to distract us from today. And should we miss the mark today, tomorrow is always a brand new microcosm of our lives to be explored, lived, and loved! Have fun in your today!